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Tropical Tease

Barbados fulfills the clichéd image of a tropical Caribbean isle fringed by talcum powder-white sand beaches and azure seas. But peel back the exterior, and the island offers far more than a mere beach holiday destination. Endowed with 113 km of beaches, first-time visitors can be forgiven for heading straight for the sand and surf.

Most tourists flock to the island’s legendary Platinum Coast to the west, which is lined with world-class luxury resorts, spa hotels, sophisticated restaurants and manicured golf courses, all lapped by the limpid Caribbean Sea. The south coast has some of the best beaches while the east coast, pummeled by the Atlantic Ocean, is less developed and attracts mainly surfers.

Although Barbados’ interior is unremarkable compared to its Caribbean neighbours, a jeep safari provides the best way to discover crumbling sugar mills, historic plantation houses, traditional churches reminiscent of England and colonial Bridgetown.

Combine this with Barbados’ indelible laid-back vibe, its passion for rum and calypso-infused festivals, and it’s no wonder people return here time and time again. Barbados is an island country in the Lesser Antilles. It is situated in the western area of the North Atlantic and east of the Windward Islands and the Caribbean Sea.

Climate

The country is generally split into two seasons. Known as the wet season, this period runs from March to November. The annual precipitation ranges between 40 inches and 90 inches. From December to May, average temperatures range from 21-31°C, while between June and November, they range from 23-31°C. Barbados is regarded as a tropical monsoon climate. However, gentle breezes of 12-16 kmph abound throughout the year and give Barbados a warm climate, which is moderately tropical.

FILM BARBADOS

Film Barbados is a full-service production company geared to facilitate every aspect of photo shoots, commercials, music videos, movies and television productions. It is internationally experienced and provides professional and management capabilities of the highest calibre.

For feature films, TV movies, television productions and documentaries, Film Barbados charges an all-inclusive Production Service Fee based on the local costs or a negotiated fee by arrangement, depending on the circumstances. Local costs should be paid in cash or by Barbados cheque. Film Barbados can set up bank accounts for productions to use in Barbados. Funds are required in the production account prior to commencement of production.

CUSTOMS AND IMMIGRATION

Film Barbados arranges the import of all equipment and materials free of duties, bonds or other charges. It can arrange instant immigration clearance for visiting crews and talent as well as special VIP treatment. There are no restrictions on the number of foreign employees on a production, no local unions, and no obligation to hire local cast and crew.

FIVE REASONS TO SHOOT YOUR NEXT PRODUCTION IN BARBADOS

• Great diversity and choice of beautiful, fresh locations

• Local crews and equipment at competitive prices

• English as the first language, US dollars accepted everywhere

• No shooting permits, no work permits, no customs duty on equipment,

• Great hotels, great restaurants and great leisure facilities

LOCAL TAXES

All camera, grip and lighting gear, props, vehicles and other industry equipment can be imported free of duty. There are no local taxes on foreign employees or on foreign productions. Local goods and services are subject to 15-per cent VAT (7.5 per cent on hotel costs) but Film Barbados is able to claim this back for visiting productions.

TERMS OF BUSINESS

On awarding the job to Film Barbados:

25 per cent of approved estimated budget is to be wired to Film Barbados US Dollar A/C

First day of principle photography:

65 per cent of approved estimated budget is to be wired to Film Barbados US Dollar A/C

On actualisation of budget: 10 per cent of approved estimated budget is to be wired to Film Barbados US Dollar A/C. Should the job come under-budget, the difference will be subtracted from the final wire. Should the job go over-budget, the difference will be added to the final wire.

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