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The World In One City

Already familiar among Indian filmmakers, Cape Town, South Africa, offers Bollywood productions versatility, variety and some juicy incentives

Cape Town is the second-most populous city in South Africa, after Johannesburg, and the provincial capital and primate city of the Western Cape. Located at the southern toe of the African continent, Cape Town is home to the soaring Table Mountain, golden beaches and bountiful vineyards. It has been capturing filmmaker’s hearts since ages.

The Cape Town region has a lot in common with Southern California, with its Mediterranean climate, extensive coastline, rugged mountain ranges, coastal plains, inland valleys and semi-desert fringes. Cape Town city itself is at approximately the same latitude as Sydney and Buenos Aires and the equivalent of Los Angeles in the northern hemisphere. Cape Town lies on a peninsula dominated by a spectacular mountain range that separates the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and ends in Table Mountain, which forms a dramatic backdrop for the City Bowl of Cape Town and the CBD. It’s a paradise for filmmakers with its enormous variety of filming locations.

The Indian Ocean side of the Peninsula is dotted with quaint seaside village-type suburbs with smaller beaches. The Atlantic side has a mix of longer, pristine beaches and high-end cosmopolitan suburbs, some of which are similar to Monte Carlo’s coastline. Inland suburbs range from townships with shack dwellings to high-value properties to farmlands and vineyards. The city, which dates back to the 1600s, has a huge range of architecture from various periods, culminating in the ultra-modern. There are also many older areas within the city limits with ill-maintained, deteriorated buildings.

Climate

Cape Town has a warm summer, Mediterranean climate with dry, warm summers (October to March) and temperatures averaging from about 15.0 °C to 27.0 °C. Late spring and early summer often feature a strong south-easterly wind. Winters (June to August) are moderately wet and temperatures average from about 8.5 °C to 18.0 °C. Winter storms are separated by quite frequent bouts of warmth and sunshine.

Incentives

The South African Department of Trade & Industry (DTI) offers two incentives to promote the South African film production and post-production industry. The first incentive is the Foreign Film and TV Production and Post-Production Incentive, to attract foreign-based film productions to shoot on location in South Africa and conduct post-production activities there. The second is the South African Film and Television Production and Co-Production Incentive, to assist local film producers in the production of local content.

Foreign Film & Television Production & Post-Production Incentive

The objectives of this incentive are to attract large-budget films and television productions and post-production work.

The incentives are:

Shooting on location, the incentive is 20 per cent of the Qualifying South African Production Expenditure (QSAPE). There is no cap for this incentive

Shooting on location in SA and conducting post-production with a Qualifying SA Post-Production Expenditure (QSAPPE) in SA of R1.5 million, the incentive is 22.5 per cent of QSAPE and QSAPPE (an additional 2.5 per cent, cumulative 22.5 per cent)

Shooting on location in SA and conducting post-production with a QSAPPE of R3 million and more in SA, the incentive is 25 per cent of QSAPE and QSAPPE (an additional 5 per cent, cumulative 25 per cent)

Foreign post-production with QSAPPE of R1.5 million, the incentive is 22.5 per cent of QSAPPE

Foreign post-production with QSAPPE of R3 million and more the incentive is 25 per cent of QSAPPE

Eligibility

Incentives are granted to foreign-owned qualifying productions and SA qualifying post-production work where:

QSAPE is R12 million and more, provided that at least 50 per cent of the principal photography schedule is filmed in SA, for a minimum four weeks

QSAPPE is R1.5 million and more, provided that 100 per cent of the post-production is conducted in SA, for a minimum two weeks

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